plus bas en français
My Hands in your Shoes
My Hands In Your Shoes
 
When I make my sculptures I use as little technique as possible, and I work in a very basic way. I always use the same epoxy resin (a self hardening paste with two Kneedpox® components). I use it like modeling clay and sometimes apply it on a soft or rigid mount, on PVC or Styrofoam. This allows me to construct my sculptures with minimal manipulation. Most of the time there is just a line, a little bit of flesh and simple gestures  such as I could have had when I was a child. Those childhood years when we would stay for a long time watching a stick thrust in sand and water, producing nothing more than mere activity : life itself.
 
My sculptures all have a strong connection with the human body, and I use the word « postures » for the spatial positions that I give them. However the sculptures seem to have trouble standing up, maintaining an attitude, taking on a function : they do not pose ; they do not find their position naturally, they are unable to maintain their social rank or their status as sculptures. Their fixity retains a labile aspect, their  « psyche  » becomes tainted with emotions linked to transition, instability and uncertainty. When placing them within an architectural space, I arrange them in such a way as to relate them more to theatrical space than to exhibition space. And these reconstituted scenes could be viewed as scenes from family life, considering that I also take pictures of my family and friends and include their portraits in my installations.
 
My fascination with families comes from the way they produce bodies that look like one another, even if each one takes on a distinctive role, such as brother, sister or niece. The reproduction of the same physical traits from one body to another, what we call a family air, resemblances between members with the same roots, to me seems to suggest a lack of differentiation. From an almost monstrous incarnation of resemblance, which seems to determine beings before they are even born, I dream up a psychological community, mirrorical relations.
 
It would be difficult for me to say where such a psychological community lies, or if it is anything more than a fantasy. For example there are two photographs that have become fundamental in my work. A portrait of my sister presenting the camera with a birthday cake, an apple pie decorated with candles (My Sister Like I Am). We look alike. We have the same square jaw. Just like a boy, she is wearing her cap backwards, and on the photograph her gesture is the same one that I have in my profession : showing things. On another double portrait of each one of us, we had ourselves photographed wearing the same diving mask, to make our two faces look similar (My Complice I). Part of our features have become invisible and identical. Both our faces are equally masculine and feminine. Family resemblance is stronger than individual or sexual characteristics, stronger than differences. The main goal of this photographic experiment is to show that my sister and I could be substituted for one another. I am like her, I am my sister, my sister is me, and this gives me great pleasure without really understanding why. Such a situation disrupts the sexual identity imposed by family organization, as well as the differences that such a sexual distinction would make on desire. It enables us to imagine other permutations between all the members of the family (Les Petites filles (The Little Girls)) or even beyond, in a sort of general indetermination (Le Garçon comme ma sœur comme je suis (The Boy Like my Sister Like I Am)). Staging such games with resemblance and confusion in the chain of identification gives the issues of identity and differentiation an uncertain and unstable answer, which sometimes appears in my work in a distressful way, and even leads to lying down on a heater (Sister Circle Foot on Radiator).
 
This is the indistinct background upon which lies – it does not lie just on a heater – the elaboration of my sculptures, which then ramify into individual figures. They all have a fetish like dimension. As if my own body, and the memory that it carries of this experience of confusion, ran through each one of them. This manifests itself through the repetition of my own forms and gestures, which also bears a relation to the repetitive work and the generic copies mass produced by industry. I have narrowed down my gestures to extremely basic actions : shaping cylinders and producing an angle with a line, otherwise called an elbow. My work has integrated the same specialized and repetitive gestures as in Charlie Chaplin's Modern Timesas I tirelessly repeat my own sculptures. I can then no longer completely recognize myself in the work that I am recopying, because it is no longer completely mine. I've stolen my own gestures, since I continue reproducing the gestures I created several years earlier, which have now become the gestures of another (Not the Reproduction of Something I Experienced Myself).
 
My hypothesis is that my gestures are a cross between the machine like conditions of chain work and the polymorphic identity of a purely biological production. Every time I accomplish them, I try to create a vital chain, to inject the flesh that I am kneading, to mix desire into it and to produce singularly non-objective objects : they become quickly charged with subjectivity, becoming subjects as well.
 
The elbow, this very simple action of producing an angle, then becomes an attempt at a minimal sculptural gesture : straightening out the cylinder or the penalty of an erection. In the end, as a sculptor, what is it that I should be producing ? Elevation. What is it that makes it stand up and hold ? Something like desire, and that I see as such; something that has found its self expression through the epoxy that I knead, in this carnal relation related to a regressive, oral or scatological activity bearing a sexual aspect. In any case it is about manipulating matter in an undetermined way somewhere between desire and work, between working on desire and working on production. Considering this, the work might no longer be identifiable through its end result ; it might be better understood in relation to what it is all on its own : a production and a practice of oneself.
 en français
en français
en français
in french
 
Mes mains dans tes chaussures
Je fabrique mes sculptures avec le moins de technique possible et opère de façon très élémentaire. J’utilise toujours la même résine époxy (une pâte autodurcissante à deux composants Kneedpox®). Je m’en sers comme d’une pâte à modeler qu’il m’arrive d’appliquer sur un support, mou ou rigide, sur des PVC ou du polystyrène. Ceci me permet de faire le minimum requis pour l’élaboration de mes sculptures. Le plus souvent une ligne, un peu de chair et des gestes simples tels que j'aurais pu les faire, enfant. Quand on s’occupait longtemps, absorbé par un bâton plongé dans du sable et de l’eau, et qu’on ne produisait alors rien d’autre que de l’activité : la vie même.
 
Mes sculptures ont toutes une forte connexion avec le corps humain, et je qualifie de postures les positions que je leur fais prendre dans l’espace. Cependant mes sculptures semblent avoir des difficultés à se tenir debout, à avoir une attitude, à avoir une fonction : elles ne posent pas; elles ne trouvent pas naturellement leur position, elles ne savent ni tenir leur rang social ni leur statut de sculptures. Leur immobilité garde quelque chose de labile, leur  «rpsychisme » se colore d’affects liés à la transition, à l’instabilité et à l’incertitude. Quand il s’agit de les inscrire dans l’architecture, je les place selon un ordre qui relève moins de l’exposition que de l’espace dramaturgique. Et ces scènes que je reconstitue ainsi pourraient être vues comme des scènes familiales sachant que je photographie par ailleurs ma famille et mes proches et présente leurs portraits dans mes installations.
 
Ma fascination pour la famille tient à sa capacité à produire des corps qui se ressemblent, même si on assigne à chacun un rôle distinctif, tel que frère, sœur ou nièce. La reproduction des mêmes traits physiques d’un corps à l’autre, c’est-à-dire l’air de famille, les ressemblances familiales qui courent entre les membres d’une même souche, seraient pour moi comme les marques ou la suggestion d’un manque de distinction. À partir d'une incarnation presque monstrueuse de la ressemblance, qui semble déterminer les êtres avant même leur naissance, je rêve une communauté psychique, des relations miroiriques.
 
J’aurais quelques difficultés à dire à quel niveau se trouve une telle communauté psychique ou encore si elle est autre chose qu’un fantasme. Il y a par exemple deux photographies qui sont pour moi devenues fondamentales dans mon travail. Un portrait de ma sœur présentant un gâteau d'anniversaire, une tarte aux pommes décorée de bougies  (My Sister Like I Am). Nous nous ressemblons. Nous avons la même mâchoire carrée. Comme un garçon, elle porte sa casquette à l’envers et son geste sur l’image est le même que celui que je fais dans mon métier:: montrer des choses. Ailleurs, dans un double portrait de chacun de nous, nous nous sommes faits photographier portant le même masque de plongée, de façon à faire s’équivaloir nos deux visages (My Complice I). Une partie de nos traits est pratiquement invisible et rendue identique. Nos visages sont presque l’un et l’autre aussi masculin que féminin. L’air de famille prime sur les individualités et la sexuation, sur les différences. L’objet principal de ces expériences photographiques est une forme de substituabilité entre ma sœur et moi. Je suis comme elle, je suis ma sœur, ma sœur est moi, et j’en tire un grand plaisir sans très bien comprendre pourquoi. C'est une situation qui perturbe à la fois la sexuation imposée par l'ordre familial et les différences du désir marquées par cette distinction sexuelle. Elle permet d’imaginer d'autres permutations entre tous les membres de la famille (Les Petites filles) et même au-delà dans une sorte d’indistinction généralisée (Le Garçon comme ma sœur comme je suis). La mise en scène de ces jeux de ressemblance et de confusion dans la chaîne des identifications donne à la question de l'identité, et donc à celle de la différence, une réponse incertaine, instable, qui se vit dans mon travail de manière parfois angoissante, jusqu'à finir par se coucher sur un radiateur (Sister Circle Foot on Radiator).
 C’est sur ce fond d’indistinction - et pas seulement sur un 
C’est sur ce fond d’indistinction - et pas seulement sur un radiateurr- que s’élaborent mes sculptures et qu’elles se ramifient ensuite en individualités. Toutes ont une dimension fétichiste. Comme si mon corps et la mémoire qu’il a de cette expérience de l’indistinction passaient dans chacune d’elles. Cela se manifeste par la répétition de mes propres formes et de mes gestes, qui ne sont pas sans rapport avec le travail répétitif et les copies génériques dupliquées massivement par la production industrielle. J’ai réduit mes gestes à des actions extrêmement rudimentaires : former des cylindres et produire un angle avec une ligne, en d’autres termes un coude. J’ai intégré dans mon travail les mêmes gestes spécialisés et répétitifs du Charlot des Temps modernes et recopie inlassablement mes propres sculptures. Je ne peux alors plus tout à fait me reconnaître dans le travail que je recopie, parce qu’il n’est plus complètement le mien. Je me suis volé mes propres gestes, puisque je continue de reproduire ceux que j’avais élaborés quelques années plus tôt, devenus désormais ceux d’un autre (Not the Reproduction of Something I Experienced Myself).

Je pose l’hypothèse que mes gestes recroisent les conditions 
Je pose l’hypothèse que mes gestes recroisent les conditions machiniques d’un travail à la chaîne et l’identité polymorphe d’une production purement biologique. À chaque fois que je les accomplis, j’essaie d’en faire un enchaînement vital, d’y injecter la chair que je pétris, d’y confondre du désir et de produire des objets singulièrement peu objectifs : parce qu’ils se chargent rapidement de subjectivité, dans le sens où ils deviennent aussi des sujets.
Le coude, cette action très simple de produire un angle, est peut-  
Le coude, cette action très simple de produire un angle, est peut-être alors le désir d’un geste sculptural minimum : le redressement d’un cylindre ou la pénitence d’une érection. Au fond, que faut-il que je fasse en tant que sculpteur ? De l'élévation. Qu'est-ce qui fait que ça se redresse et que ça tient debout ? Quelque chose qui tient du désir et que je perçois comme tel ; quelque chose qui a trouvé une façon de se dire avec l'époxy que je malaxe, dans cette relation charnelle qui relève d’une activité régressive, orale ou scatologique, à valeur sexuelle. Il s’agit en tout cas d’une matière que je manipule dans une forme d'indistinction entre désir et travail, entre travail du désir et travail de la production. Dans cette optique, le travail ne serait alors plus forcément identifiable à ses produits ; il serait plutôt compréhensible par rapport à ce qu’il est par lui-même : une production et une pratique de soi.
plus bas en français
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
My Hands in your Shoes
My Hands In Your Shoes
 
When I make my sculptures I use as little technique as possible, and I work in a very basic way. I always use the same epoxy resin (a self hardening paste with two Kneedpox® components). I use it like modeling clay and sometimes apply it on a soft or rigid mount, on PVC or Styrofoam. This allows me to construct my sculptures with minimal manipulation. Most of the time there is just a line, a little bit of flesh and simple gestures  such as I could have had when I was a child. Those childhood years when we would stay for a long time watching a stick thrust in sand and water, producing nothing more than mere activity : life itself.
 
My sculptures all have a strong connection with the human body, and I use the word « postures » for the spatial positions that I give them. However the sculptures seem to have trouble standing up, maintaining an attitude, taking on a function : they do not pose ; they do not find their position naturally, they are unable to maintain their social rank or their status as sculptures. Their fixity retains a labile aspect, their  « psyche  » becomes tainted with emotions linked to transition, instability and uncertainty. When placing them within an architectural space, I arrange them in such a way as to relate them more to theatrical space than to exhibition space. And these reconstituted scenes could be viewed as scenes from family life, considering that I also take pictures of my family and friends and include their portraits in my installations.
 
My fascination with families comes from the way they produce bodies that look like one another, even if each one takes on a distinctive role, such as brother, sister or niece. The reproduction of the same physical traits from one body to another, what we call a family air, resemblances between members with the same roots, to me seems to suggest a lack of differentiation. From an almost monstrous incarnation of resemblance, which seems to determine beings before they are even born, I dream up a psychological community, relations.
 
It would be difficult for me to say where such a psychological community lies, or if it is anything more than a fantasy. For example there are two photographs that have become fundamental in my work. A portrait of my sister presenting the camera with a birthday cake, an apple pie decorated with candles (). We look alike. We have the same square jaw. Just like a boy, she is wearing her cap backwards, and on the photograph her gesture is the same one that I have in my profession : showing things. On another double portrait of each one of us, we had ourselves photographed wearing the same diving mask, to make our two faces look similar ). Part of our features have become invisible and identical. Both our faces are equally masculine and feminine. Family resemblance is stronger than individual or sexual characteristics, stronger than differences. The main goal of this photographic experiment is to show that my sister and I could be substituted for one another. I am like her, I am my sister, my sister is me, and this gives me great pleasure without really understanding why. Such a situation disrupts the sexual identity imposed by family organization, as well as the differences that such a sexual distinction would make on desire. It enables us to imagine other permutations between all the members of the family ((The Boy Like my Sister Like I Am)). Staging such games with resemblance and confusion in the chain of identification gives the issues of identity and differentiation an uncertain and unstable answer, which sometimes appears in my work in a distressful way, and even leads to lying down on a heater 
 
This is the indistinct background upon which lies – it does not lie just on a heater – the elaboration of my sculptures, which then ramify into individual figures. They all have a fetish like dimension. As if my own body, and the memory that it carries of this experience of confusion, ran through each one of them. This manifests itself through the repetition of my own forms and gestures, which also bears a relation to the repetitive work and the generic copies mass produced by industry. I have narrowed down my gestures to extremely basic actions : shaping cylinders and producing an angle with a line, otherwise called an elbow. My work has integrated the same specialized and repetitive gestures as in Charlie Chaplin's work that I am recopying, because it is no longer completely mine. I've stolen my own gestures, since I continue reproducing the gestures I created several years earlier, which have now become the gestures of another 
 
My hypothesis is that my gestures are a cross between the machine like conditions of chain work and the polymorphic identity of a purely biological production. Every time I accomplish them, I try to create a vital chain, to inject the flesh that I am kneading, to mix desire into it and to produce singularly non-objective objects : they become quickly charged with subjectivity, becoming subjects as well.
 
The elbow, this very simple action of producing an angle, then becomes an attempt at a minimal sculptural gesture : straightening out the cylinder or the penalty of an erection. In the end, as a sculptor, what is it that I should be producing ? Elevation. What is it that makes it stand up and hold ? Something like desire, and that I see as such; something that has found its self expression through the epoxy that I knead, in this carnal relation related to a regressive, oral or scatological activity bearing a sexual aspect. In any case it is about manipulating matter in an undetermined way somewhere between desire and work, between working on desire and working on production. Considering this, the work might no longer be identifiable through its end result ; it might be better understood in relation to what it is all on its own : a production and a practice of oneself.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 en français
en français
en français
in french
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mes mains dans tes chaussures
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Je fabrique mes sculptures avec le moins de technique possible et opère de façon très élémentaire. J’utilise toujours la même résine époxy (une pâte autodurcissante à deux composants Kneedpox®). Je m’en sers comme d’une pâte à modeler qu’il m’arrive d’appliquer sur un support, mou ou rigide, sur des PVC ou du polystyrène. Ceci me permet de faire le minimum requis pour l’élaboration de mes sculptures. Le plus souvent une ligne, un peu de chair et des gestes simples tels que j'aurais pu les faire, enfant. Quand on s’occupait longtemps, absorbé par un bâton plongé dans du sable et de l’eau, et qu’on ne produisait alors rien d’autre que de l’activité : la vie même.
 
Mes sculptures ont toutes une forte connexion avec le corps humain, et je qualifie de postures les positions que je leur fais prendre dans l’espace. Cependant mes sculptures semblent avoir des difficultés à se tenir debout, à avoir une attitude, à avoir une fonction : elles ne posent pas; elles ne trouvent pas naturellement leur position, elles ne savent ni tenir leur rang social ni leur statut de sculptures. Leur immobilité garde quelque chose de labile, leur  «rpsychisme » se colore d’affects liés à la transition, à l’instabilité et à l’incertitude. Quand il s’agit de les inscrire dans l’architecture, je les place selon un ordre qui relève moins de l’exposition que de l’espace dramaturgique. Et ces scènes que je reconstitue ainsi pourraient être vues comme des scènes familiales sachant que je photographie par ailleurs ma famille et mes proches et présente leurs portraits dans mes installations.
 
Ma fascination pour la famille tient à sa capacité à produire des corps qui se ressemblent, même si on assigne à chacun un rôle distinctif, tel que frère, sœur ou nièce. La reproduction des mêmes traits physiques d’un corps à l’autre, c’est-à-dire l’air de famille, les ressemblances familiales qui courent entre les membres d’une même souche, seraient pour moi comme les marques ou la suggestion d’un manque de distinction. À partir d'une incarnation presque monstrueuse de la ressemblance, qui semble déterminer les êtres avant même leur naissance, je rêve une communauté psychique, des relations.
 
J’aurais quelques difficultés à dire à quel niveau se trouve une telle communauté psychique ou encore si elle est autre chose qu’un fantasme. Il y a par exemple deux photographies qui sont pour moi devenues fondamentales dans mon travail. Un portrait de ma sœur présentant un gâteau d'anniversaire, une tarte aux pommes décorée de bougies  ( Nous nous ressemblons. Nous avons la même mâchoire carrée. Comme un garçon, elle porte sa casquette à l’envers et son geste sur l’image est le même que celui que je fais dans mon métier:: montrer des choses. Ailleurs, dans un double portrait de chacun de nous, nous nous sommes faits photographier portant le même masque de plongée, de façon à faire s’équivaloir nos deux visages (ualités et la sexuation, sur les différences. L’objet principal de ces expériences photographiques est une forme de substituabilité entre ma sœur et moi. Je suis comme elle, je suis ma sœur, ma sœur est moi, et j’en tire un grand plaisir sans très bien comprendre pourquoi. C'est une situation qui perturbe à la fois la sexuation imposée par l'ordre familial et les différences du désir marquées par cette distinction sexuelle. Elle permet d’imaginer d'autres permutations entre tous les membres de la famille ( La mise en scène de ces jeux de ressemblance et de confusion dans la chaîne des identifications donne à la question de l'identité, et donc à celle de la différence, une réponse incertaine, instable, qui se vit dans mon travail de manière parfois angoissante, jusqu'à finir par se coucher sur un radiateur (.
 C’est sur ce fond d’indistinction - et pas seulement sur un 
C’est sur ce fond d’indistinction - et pas seulement sur un radiateurr- que s’élaborent mes sculptures et qu’elles se ramifient ensuite en individualités. Toutes ont une dimension fétichiste. Comme si mon corps et la mémoire qu’il a de cette expérience de l’indistinction passaient dans chacune d’elles. Cela se manifeste par la répétition de mes propres formes et de mes gestes, qui ne sont pas sans rapport avec le travail répétitif et les copies génériques dupliquées massivement par la production industrielle. J’ai réduit mes gestes à des actions extrêmement rudimentaires : former des cylindres et produire un angle avec une ligne, en d’autres termes un coude. J’ai intégré dans mon travail les mêmes gestes spécialisés et répétitifs du Charlot des et recopie inlassablement mes propres sculptures. Je ne peux alors plus tout à fait me reconnaître dans le travail que je recopie, parce qu’il n’est plus complètement le mien. Je me suis volé mes propres gestes, puisque je continue de reproduire ceux que j’avais élaborés quelques années plus tôt, devenus désormais ceux d’un autre (

 
 
 
 
 
Je pose l’hypothèse que mes gestes recroisent les conditions 
Je pose l’hypothèse que mes gestes recroisent les conditions machiniques d’un travail à la chaîne et l’identité polymorphe d’une production purement biologique. À chaque fois que je les accomplis, j’essaie d’en faire un enchaînement vital, d’y injecter la chair que je pétris, d’y confondre du désir et de produire des objets singulièrement peu objectifs : parce qu’ils se chargent rapidement de subjectivité, dans le sens où ils deviennent aussi des sujets.
Le coude, cette action très simple de produire un angle, est peut-  
Le coude, cette action très simple de produire un angle, est peut-être alors le désir d’un geste sculptural minimum : le redressement d’un cylindre ou la pénitence d’une érection. Au fond, que faut-il que je fasse en tant que sculpteur ? De l'élévation. Qu'est-ce qui fait que ça se redresse et que ça tient debout ? Quelque chose qui tient du désir et que je perçois comme tel ; quelque chose qui a trouvé une façon de se dire avec l'époxy que je malaxe, dans cette relation charnelle qui relève d’une activité régressive, orale ou scatologique, à valeur sexuelle. Il s’agit en tout cas d’une matière que je manipule dans une forme d'indistinction entre désir et travail, entre travail du désir et travail de la production. Dans cette optique, le travail ne serait alors plus forcément identifiable à ses produits ; il serait plutôt compréhensible par rapport à ce qu’il est par lui-même : une production et une pratique de soi.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
My Hands in your Shoes
My Hands In Your Shoes
 
When I make my sculptures I use as little technique as possible, and I work in a very basic way. I always use the same epoxy resin (a self hardening paste with two Kneedpox® components). I use it like modeling clay and sometimes apply it on a soft or rigid mount, on PVC or Styrofoam. This allows me to construct my sculptures with minimal manipulation. Most of the time there is just a line, a little bit of flesh and simple gestures  such as I could have had when I was a child. Those childhood years when we would stay for a long time watching a stick thrust in sand and water, producing nothing more than mere activity : life itself.
 
My sculptures all have a strong connection with the human body, and I use the word « postures » for the spatial positions that I give them. However the sculptures seem to have trouble standing up, maintaining an attitude, taking on a function : they do not pose ; they do not find their position naturally, they are unable to maintain their social rank or their status as sculptures. Their fixity retains a labile aspect, their  « psyche  » becomes tainted with emotions linked to transition, instability and uncertainty. When placing them within an architectural space, I arrange them in such a way as to relate them more to theatrical space than to exhibition space. And these reconstituted scenes could be viewed as scenes from family life, considering that I also take pictures of my family and friends and include their portraits in my installations.
 
My fascination with families comes from the way they produce bodies that look like one another, even if each one takes on a distinctive role, such as brother, sister or niece. The reproduction of the same physical traits from one body to another, what we call a family air, resemblances between members with the same roots, to me seems to suggest a lack of differentiation. From an almost monstrous incarnation of resemblance, which seems to determine beings before they are even born, I dream up a psychological community, relations.
 
It would be difficult for me to say where such a psychological community lies, or if it is anything more than a fantasy. For example there are two photographs that have become fundamental in my work. A portrait of my sister presenting the camera with a birthday cake, an apple pie decorated with candles ). We look alike. We have the same square jaw. Just like a boy, she is wearing her cap backwards, and on the photograph her gesture is the same one that I have in my profession : showing things. On another double portrait of each one of us, we had ourselves photographed wearing the same diving mask, to make our two faces look similar masculine and feminine. Family resemblance is stronger than individual or sexual characteristics, stronger than differences. The main goal of this photographic experiment is to show that my sister and I could be substituted for one another. I am like her, I am my sister, my sister is me, and this gives me great pleasure without really understanding why. Such a situation disrupts the sexual identity imposed by family organization, as well as the differences that such a sexual distinction would make on desire. It enables us to imagine other permutations between all the members of the family he Boy Like my Sister Like I Am)). Staging such games with resemblance and confusion in the chain of identification gives the issues of identity and differentiation an uncertain and unstable answer, which sometimes appears in my work in a distressful way, and even leads to lying down on a heater (
 
This is the indistinct background upon which lies – it does not lie just on a heater – the elaboration of my sculptures, which then ramify into individual figures. They all have a fetish like dimension. As if my own body, and the memory that it carries of this experience of confusion, ran through each one of them. This manifests itself through the repetition of my own forms and gestures, which also bears a relation to the repetitive work and the generic copies mass produced by industry. I have narrowed down my gestures to extremely basic actions : shaping cylinders and producing an angle with a line, otherwise called an elbow. My work has integrated the same specialized and repetitive gestures as in Charlie Chaplin's as I tirelessly repeat my own sculptures. I can then no longer completely recognize myself in the work that I am recopying, because it is no longer completely mine. I've stolen my own gestures, since I continue reproducing the gestures I created several years earlier, which have now become the gestures of another 
 
My hypothesis is that my gestures are a cross between the machine like conditions of chain work and the polymorphic identity of a purely biological production. Every time I accomplish them, I try to create a vital chain, to inject the flesh that I am kneading, to mix desire into it and to produce singularly non-objective objects : they become quickly charged with subjectivity, becoming subjects as well.
 
The elbow, this very simple action of producing an angle, then becomes an attempt at a minimal sculptural gesture : straightening out the cylinder or the penalty of an erection. In the end, as a sculptor, what is it that I should be producing ? Elevation. What is it that makes it stand up and hold ? Something like desire, and that I see as such; something that has found its self expression through the epoxy that I knead, in this carnal relation related to a regressive, oral or scatological activity bearing a sexual aspect. In any case it is about manipulating matter in an undetermined way somewhere between desire and work, between working on desire and working on production. Considering this, the work might no longer be identifiable through its end result ; it might be better understood in relation to what it is all on its own : a production and a practice of oneself.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 en français
en français
en français
in french
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mes mains dans tes chaussures
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Je fabrique mes sculptures avec le moins de technique possible et opère de façon très élémentaire. J’utilise toujours la même résine époxy (une pâte autodurcissante à deux composants Kneedpox®). Je m’en sers comme d’une pâte à modeler qu’il m’arrive d’appliquer sur un support, mou ou rigide, sur des PVC ou du polystyrène. Ceci me permet de faire le minimum requis pour l’élaboration de mes sculptures. Le plus souvent une ligne, un peu de chair et des gestes simples tels que j'aurais pu les faire, enfant. Quand on s’occupait longtemps, absorbé par un bâton plongé dans du sable et de l’eau, et qu’on ne produisait alors rien d’autre que de l’activité : la vie même.
 
Mes sculptures ont toutes une forte connexion avec le corps humain, et je qualifie de postures les positions que je leur fais prendre dans l’espace. Cependant mes sculptures semblent avoir des difficultés à se tenir debout, à avoir une attitude, à avoir une fonction : elles ne posent pas; elles ne trouvent pas naturellement leur position, elles ne savent ni tenir leur rang social ni leur statut de sculptures. Leur immobilité garde quelque chose de labile, leur  «rpsychisme » se colore d’affects liés à la transition, à l’instabilité et à l’incertitude. Quand il s’agit de les inscrire dans l’architecture, je les place selon un ordre qui relève moins de l’exposition que de l’espace dramaturgique. Et ces scènes que je reconstitue ainsi pourraient être vues comme des scènes familiales sachant que je photographie par ailleurs ma famille et mes proches et présente leurs portraits dans mes installations.
 
Ma fascination pour la famille tient à sa capacité à produire des corps qui se ressemblent, même si on assigne à chacun un rôle distinctif, tel que frère, sœur ou nièce. La reproduction des mêmes traits physiques d’un corps à l’autre, c’est-à-dire l’air de famille, les ressemblances familiales qui courent entre les membres d’une même souche, seraient pour moi comme les marques ou la suggestion d’un manque de distinction. À partir d'une incarnation presque monstrueuse de la ressemblance, qui semble déterminer les êtres avant même leur naissance, je rêve une communauté psychique, des relations.
 
J’aurais quelques difficultés à dire à quel niveau se trouve une telle communauté psychique ou encore si elle est autre chose qu’un fantasme. Il y a par exemple deux photographies qui sont pour moi devenues fondamentales dans mon travail. Un portrait de ma sœur présentant un gâteau d'anniversaire, une tarte aux pommes décorée de bougies  (
us nous ressemblons. Nous avons la même mâchoire carrée. Comme un garçon, elle porte sa casquette à l’envers et son geste sur l’image est le même que celui que je fais dans mon métier:: montrer des choses. Ailleurs, dans un double portrait de chacun de nous, nous nous sommes faits photographier portant le même masque de plongée, de façon à faire s’équivaloir nos deux visages  Une partie de nos traits est pratiquement invisible et rendue identique. Nos visages sont presque l’un et l’autre aussi masculin que féminin. L’air de famille prime sur les individualités et la sexuation, sur les différences. L’objet principal de ces expériences photographiques est une forme de substituabilité entre ma sœur et moi. Je suis comme elle, je suis ma sœur, ma sœur est moi, et j’en tire un grand plaisir sans très bien comprendre pourquoi. C'est une situation qui perturbe à la fois la sexuation imposée par l'ordre familial et les différences du désir marquées par cette distinction sexuelle. Elle permet d’imaginer d'autres permutations entre tous les membres de la famille ise en scène de ces jeux de ressemblance et de confusion dans la chaîne des identifications donne à la question de l'identité, et donc à celle de la différence, une réponse incertaine, instable, qui se vit dans mon travail de manière parfois angoissante, jusqu'à finir par se coucher sur un radiateur (
 C’est sur ce fond d’indistinction - et pas seulement sur un 
C’est sur ce fond d’indistinction - et pas seulement sur un radiateurr- que s’élaborent mes sculptures et qu’elles se ramifient ensuite en individualités. Toutes ont une dimension fétichiste. Comme si mon corps et la mémoire qu’il a de cette expérience de l’indistinction passaient dans chacune d’elles. Cela se manifeste par la répétition de mes propres formes et de mes gestes, qui ne sont pas sans rapport avec le travail répétitif et les copies génériques dupliquées massivement par la production industrielle. J’ai réduit mes gestes à des actions extrêmement rudimentaires : former des cylindres et produire un angle avec une ligne, en d’autres termes un coude. J’ai intégré dans mon travail les mêmes gestes spécialisés et répétitifs du Charlot deet recopie inlassablement mes propres sculptures. Je ne peux alors plus tout à fait me reconnaître dans le travail que je recopie, parce qu’il n’est plus complètement le mien. Je me suis volé mes propres gestes, puisque je continue de reproduire ceux que j’avais élaborés quelques années plus tôt, devenus désormais ceux d’un autre (

 
 
 
 
 
Je pose l’hypothèse que mes gestes recroisent les conditions 
Je pose l’hypothèse que mes gestes recroisent les conditions machiniques d’un travail à la chaîne et l’identité polymorphe d’une production purement biologique. À chaque fois que je les accomplis, j’essaie d’en faire un enchaînement vital, d’y injecter la chair que je pétris, d’y confondre du désir et de produire des objets singulièrement peu objectifs : parce qu’ils se chargent rapidement de subjectivité, dans le sens où ils deviennent aussi des sujets.
Le coude, cette action très simple de produire un angle, est peut-  
Le coude, cette action très simple de produire un angle, est peut-être alors le désir d’un geste sculptural minimum : le redressement d’un cylindre ou la pénitence d’une érection. Au fond, que faut-il que je fasse en tant que sculpteur ? De l'élévation. Qu'est-ce qui fait que ça se redresse et que ça tient debout ? Quelque chose qui tient du désir et que je perçois comme tel ; quelque chose qui a trouvé une façon de se dire avec l'époxy que je malaxe, dans cette relation charnelle qui relève d’une activité régressive, orale ou scatologique, à valeur sexuelle. Il s’agit en tout cas d’une matière que je manipule dans une forme d'indistinction entre désir et travail, 
back to menu / Description as pdf
 

Charles, Charles, Charles

2016 — objects to be handled by the workers at La Galerie, centre for contemporary art, Noisy-le-Sec/Paris, fish oil, cod liver oil, pine tar, laurel oil and shoe polish on epoxy, 100 x 320 x 180 cm,
with Vanessa Desclaux, Laurent Isnard, Nathanaëlle Puaud, Clio Raterron and Emilie Renard
Charles, Charles, Charles

Les rôles respectifs

2016 — Occidental Temporary, Villejuif, overview,
framed print on baryté paper, 72 x 53 cm
Les rôles respectifs

Mégots

2016 — bread, tarbender®, paint, 30 x 8 x 5 cm
Mégots

Je t’embrasse tous

2106 — Marcelle Alix, Paris, overview
Je t’embrasse tous

Pamela

2016 — Palme, special issue, with Clément Rodzielski,
watercolor and pen on paper, 42 x 30 cm
Pamela

Fraternité Passivité Bienvenue

2016 — screen print on mirror (with Marie Proyart), 100 x 70 cm


Fraternité Passivité Bienvenue

Cale-porte

2015 — epoxy, mixed media, 42 x 13 x 14 cm
Cale-porte

Oh! Divisi, divisi, divisi…

April 8-11 2016 — performance with Jean-Christophe Arcos,
Palais de Tokyo, Paris, photo by J.-C. Arcos

Oh! Divisi, divisi, divisi…

Horizontal Thoughts

2015 — acrylic resin, sneakers, 80 x 70 x 50 cm
Horizontal Thoughts

L’Après-midi (The Afternoon)

2015 — Villa Arson, Nice, overview
L’Après-midi (The Afternoon)

Blue-jean

2015 — blue BIC® ink blown on acrylic, 80 x 60 x 90 cm
Blue-jean

Le Garçon comme ma sœur comme je suis

2015 — framed inkjet print on baryta paper, 174 x 130 cm
Le Garçon comme ma sœur comme je suis

Gus Van Sant on Ed Atkins

2015 — acetone and silk-screen on posters, 128 x 87 cm each
Gus Van Sant on Ed Atkins

Sleepin Man / Slipin Mæn

2012 — ink and graphite on post-it notes, tape, series of five, 92 x 138 cm each
Sleepin Man / Slipin Mæn

Self-Oral-Portrait Côte d’Azur Version

April 23 2014 — intervention with jumper, sand on the face
Dexia Art Center, Brussels
Self-Oral-Portrait Côte d’Azur Version

No Devil Beneath the Sea (Laurence)

2014 — epoxy on PVC, 57 x 25 x 9 cm
No Devil Beneath the Sea (Laurence)

Sirens

2012 — intervention with acetone on magazine
series of seven, 74 x 42 cm each
Sirens

Self-Oral-Portrait

2011 — 45 min intervention with shirt
Marcelle Alix, Paris (photo by Camila Renz)
Self-Oral-Portrait

Open Ateliers

2011 — Rijksakademie, Project Space South overview
Open Ateliers

Sister Circle Foot on Radiator & My Sister Like I Am

2011 — painted epoxy, metal, paper towels, radiator, 46 X 33 x 246 cm,
framed inkjet print on baryta paper, 204 x 154 cm
Sister Circle Foot on Radiator & My Sister Like I Am

Not the Reproduction of Something I Experienced Myself

2011 — metal tube, PVC tube, epoxy, lacquer, styrofoam
100 x 220 x 160 cm
Not the Reproduction of Something I Experienced Myself

Quillacq ouverte (Quillacq Open)

2010 — spray paint and silk-screen on vintage movie poster
160 x 120 cm
Quillacq ouverte (Quillacq Open)

My Complice I

2011 — C-Print, epoxy, 45 x 45 cm
My Complice I

In Search of a Good Stimulant

2011 — C-Print, 6 buckets of epoxy, acrylic paint
styrofoam, 100 X 70 x 167 cm
In Search of a Good Stimulant

back to menu

back to menu

Concept & Design : Mathias Ringgenberg  /  Programmed : Pyhai / Photographers : Pierre Antoine, Anatole Barde, Jean BrasilleAurélien MoleWillem Vermaase